Anyone have experience with Rolfing?

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cookie
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue May 29, 2007 6:51 am

Anyone have experience with Rolfing?

Post by cookie » Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:36 am

There is one reference to Rolfing on this site but apparently no personal restimonials. Please comment if you have experience. I have a friend who swares by it and is strongly encourageing me to try it. I am sceptical! Have sciatica and am afraid I could get worse. I don't think I am any different from most people who will try a lot of things if the pain is bad enough! I am doing the exercises in Rebuild Your Back but the pain is still there!

Steven
Posts: 112
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2005 10:00 pm

Post by Steven » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:43 am

Hi Cookie,

I've only heard about Rolfing. So I can't comment on it.

Did you ever try it? What is it exactly and do you think it helped you?

It's been a couple of weeks since your last post. How is the rebuilding going? Are you seeing any improvement yet?

Steven

TryNSave
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Sep 30, 2007 4:57 pm

Post by TryNSave » Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:45 pm

I tried rolfing about 15 years ago, as I thought it was mainly about deep penetrating massage that was painful but supposed to be beneficial to help balance out your body by loosening up tight muscles and whatever else can be done by pushing hard on various places in the body. It was very painful but I relaxed as much as I could while the rolfer dug his fingers deep into my skin and ran them along various muscles, etc. Tears were streaming from my eyes at one point, when he was working on my face. I wasn't crying, just tears were coming out from the pain, which I guess was just a natural reaction. I went for about 8 or 10 sessions but quit with a couple sessions left as I felt I went enough times to determine that it wasn't effective. I think that proper exercise and stretching done on a daily basis or even several times a day, is probably the best way to balance out the body. I can't imagine that going once a week or even once every few days for a treatment would help to balance out the body, because even if there was some improvement during the session, your body will likely revert back to where it was before your next appointment. However I wouldn't rule out trying other types of massage. It's probably good for relaxing muscles and maybe could help you determine which of your muscles are tight and perhaps a regular massage could play a part in getting better. However my rolfing experience was very painful. I'm thinking about getting a massage later on to maybe help me determine which muscles are tight, which might be information I can use to help my back.

bslayers
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 5:23 pm

Rolfing experience, very positive

Post by bslayers » Fri Oct 19, 2007 6:11 am

There are only a couple of hundred Certified Rolfers in the US and there are 4 in my small town area. The purpose of Rolfing is to manipulate the muscles/ligaments back to their proper position. Rolfing is not a massage and the reason it is uncomfortable is due to the movement of the muscle/ligaments. Dean talks about how Chiropractors manipulation of the spine is only temporary due to the mis-alignment being caused by our ligaments pulling the body out of position, as soon as I read that I thought of how Rolfing is a perfect fit for getting our bodies back in order. Rolfing has been used on my son who has scoliosis. He started the sessions with a very crooked spine and after a series of sessions his spine is straight and has stayed straight for over a year. :)
Hope this information is helpful.

Steve

TryNSave wrote:I tried rolfing about 15 years ago, as I thought it was mainly about deep penetrating massage that was painful but supposed to be beneficial to help balance out your body by loosening up tight muscles and whatever else can be done by pushing hard on various places in the body. It was very painful but I relaxed as much as I could while the rolfer dug his fingers deep into my skin and ran them along various muscles, etc. Tears were streaming from my eyes at one point, when he was working on my face. I wasn't crying, just tears were coming out from the pain, which I guess was just a natural reaction. I went for about 8 or 10 sessions but quit with a couple sessions left as I felt I went enough times to determine that it wasn't effective. I think that proper exercise and stretching done on a daily basis or even several times a day, is probably the best way to balance out the body. I can't imagine that going once a week or even once every few days for a treatment would help to balance out the body, because even if there was some improvement during the session, your body will likely revert back to where it was before your next appointment. However I wouldn't rule out trying other types of massage. It's probably good for relaxing muscles and maybe could help you determine which of your muscles are tight and perhaps a regular massage could play a part in getting better. However my rolfing experience was very painful. I'm thinking about getting a massage later on to maybe help me determine which muscles are tight, which might be information I can use to help my back.

bslayers
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 5:23 pm

Rolfing experience, very positive

Post by bslayers » Fri Oct 19, 2007 6:23 am

There are only a couple of hundred Certified Rolfers in the US and there are 4 in my small town area. The purpose of Rolfing is to manipulate the muscles/ligaments back to their proper position. Rolfing is not a massage and the reason it is uncomfortable is due to the movement of the muscle/ligaments. Dean talks about how Chiropractors manipulation of the spine is only temporary due to the mis-alignment being caused by our ligaments pulling the body out of position, as soon as I read that I thought of how Rolfing is a perfect fit for getting our bodies back in order. Rolfing has been used on my son who has scoliosis. He started the sessions with a very crooked spine and after a series of sessions his spine is straight and has stayed straight for over a year. :) One other interesting point, is that a experienced Rolfer can feel the inflammed nerves and make changes as needed to help the nerve settle down.
Hope this information is helpful.

Steve

TryNSave wrote:I tried rolfing about 15 years ago, as I thought it was mainly about deep penetrating massage that was painful but supposed to be beneficial to help balance out your body by loosening up tight muscles and whatever else can be done by pushing hard on various places in the body. It was very painful but I relaxed as much as I could while the rolfer dug his fingers deep into my skin and ran them along various muscles, etc. Tears were streaming from my eyes at one point, when he was working on my face. I wasn't crying, just tears were coming out from the pain, which I guess was just a natural reaction. I went for about 8 or 10 sessions but quit with a couple sessions left as I felt I went enough times to determine that it wasn't effective. I think that proper exercise and stretching done on a daily basis or even several times a day, is probably the best way to balance out the body. I can't imagine that going once a week or even once every few days for a treatment would help to balance out the body, because even if there was some improvement during the session, your body will likely revert back to where it was before your next appointment. However I wouldn't rule out trying other types of massage. It's probably good for relaxing muscles and maybe could help you determine which of your muscles are tight and perhaps a regular massage could play a part in getting better. However my rolfing experience was very painful. I'm thinking about getting a massage later on to maybe help me determine which muscles are tight, which might be information I can use to help my back.

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