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Conversation With a Massage Therapist | Rebuild Your Back

11 Oct 2007 10:51 pm

Conversation With a Massage Therapist

If you’ve been reading this blog on a regular basis, you already know that I’m a big fan of the blog, Dr. Val and the Voice of Reason. Well, long story short, she was on vacation a couple of weeks ago in California and while there took the opportunity to enjoy a nice massage.

She relates the experience in her post entitled, Conversations at the Spa. (While you read this, keep in mind that she is a medical doctor.)

Those of you with healthcare backgrounds may especially appreciate this dialog:

Therapist (scrutinizing my back as I’m face down on a table): have you seen a chiropractor recently?

Dr. Val: Um, no. Why?

Therapist: Well, two of your ribs are out.

Dr. Val: They’re ‘out?’ Where did they go?

Therapist: A chiropractor can put them back for you so your muscles won’t pull in the wrong direction.

Dr. Val: Will a chiropractor be able to fix this permanently?

Therapist: No, you’ll have to keep going.

Are you starting to get the drift? Well, it only gets better. Here’s another little sample:

Therapist: I’m using my elbows to stimulate repair cells.

Dr. Val: Ahum…

Therapist: You have lactic acid build up in your shoulders so we have to flush the toxins out with special oils. You should also drink a lot of water.

Dr. Val: What sort of toxins?

Therapist: Like, dirt and metals and stuff that you’ve been exposed to.

[Snip]

Dr. Val: How do I know how many toxins I have in my body?

Therapist: Well, your shoulders are really tight and your ribs are out so I think you probably have a lot. You’ll need a lot of massage and you need to see a chiropractor. The oils I used on you will have a calming effect, though. You’ll probably sleep really well tonight.

Dr. Val: I see (inhaling, exhaling). I hope I do.

Yikes! Makes you wonder where massage therapists get their education.

Be sure to head over and read the whole post. It’s a stitch. And be sure to check out the rest of Dr. Val’s blog. She always has lots of good information for health conscious consumers.

— Dean

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5 Responses to “Conversation With a Massage Therapist”

  1. on 14 Oct 2007 at 9:01 pm 1.Dr. Val said …

    Thanks so much for the link, Dean. I think that this particular massage therapist was a little less mainstream than many. But the “toxins” argument is very common – I just couldn’t resist probing for more insight/explanations. The more I asked the weirder it got, and then towards the end I just wished the massage came with a “mute” button. It still FELT really good. 🙂

  2. on 20 Oct 2007 at 7:26 pm 2.PalMD said …

    It sounds very familiar…i think i prefer to just turn NPR and have them shut up and work.

  3. on 11 Dec 2007 at 11:40 am 3.Shannon said …

    Just wanted to say that I am a massage therapist and I get adjusted on regular basis by a chiropractor.. Just wanted to comment on the massage therapist you stated being uneducated. She had the right idea, maybe she just could’nt explain herself properly. Give her a break. The doctor who was getting the massage could have told her she just wanted to relax, maybe that would’ve given the therapist the hint to Shut Up!!

  4. on 01 Feb 2008 at 7:19 am 4.nodamsel said …

    My education taught me the same thing. I think it is very unfortunate that there is a large rift in communication when it comes to client/therapist relationships. We all know Silence is Golden, but what to do when someone is curious as to why they start sweating, floating from the parasympathetic response, or when they are just a jerk wanting to pull your chain to get a free massage. I work for a major massage chain. Well, let me just say, the customer is “always” right. I have been massaging for almost 2 years and I know for a fact I have massaged 500 bodies, if not more. The bad part about it, is I can’t stand it anymore. And to be frank, I think most people are assholes, and I think the self righteous therapists need to step off their soap boxes and start educating other therapists instead of mocking every poor inexperienced therapist that shows up to work. And one more thing, clients can speak up and just say “be quiet, I don’t care what has an adhesion” instead they go through the entire massage expecting a mind reader to show up and tell you how they feel. And let us not forget the overly personal clients that want to know every detail of your daily life,(those are always fun to try and get to shut up), the “everything is wrong, I’m a hot mess” clients, and the ever so popular “entitled ones” who expect you to roll out a red carpet when they arrive. Please, whatever happened to manners. We aren’t robots, and I can think of a million things I would rather do than rub some smelly, hairy, old man who stares at me and smiles for 20 minutes while he lays on his back. Thanks for the web space to vent, I have 2 more weeks of this business, and then I go into herniated disk recovery because I thought I was superwoman when I started this career. Body mechanics people, it isn’t just for students anymore.

  5. on 01 Feb 2008 at 7:34 am 5.nodamsel said …

    oh yeah, and to the Dr. You are the reason for these posts. What did you expect? Doogie Howser MD. wasn’t giving you the massage, maybe you will know for next time. And there is a reason that you are a DOCTOR, common sense tells me that you are a little more educated than the average therapist. So shut the hell up, and just enjoy what you get, or stop getting massages. Because if I had to massage you, that would be a miserable hour. You are obviously looking for faults in people, you should have become a psychologist, maybe you could channel your need to analyze people and figure out why you felt the need to keep the conversation going in the first place.

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