Inversion table, lumbar extender and posture pump

Discussions relating to Lower Back Pain.

Inversion table, lumbar extender and posture pump

Postby yannick35 » Mon Aug 11, 2008 4:55 pm

I just started doing the advance program of the rebuild your back book.

Its just amazing.

I also use my inversion table after the program, my lumbar extender for the bridge exercise and the posture pump for my neck issue.

I was wondering if anyone uses theses device and what success they got with them.

Of course the evil chiros says they are not worth the money GRRRR.
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Postby Peter B » Thu Aug 14, 2008 9:09 am

I picked up an inversion table last week and I've started to work it into my exercise routine. It's a little early to tell, but I believe it's helping loosen things up a bit. I know I feel very relaxed after I get down from it. I'm taking it slowly and not going for a full upside down hang yet...you have to get used to the blood rushing to your head.
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Postby TBone » Thu Aug 14, 2008 11:03 am

Hey guys,

One doctor told me that it may actually be detrimental to hang upside down at too much of an angle. It had something to do with the paraspinal muscles tensing up in response to the inversion. I invert every so often, but the angle is very mild...somewhere around 45 degrees. I have replaced the inversion therapy with the spinal decompression squat exercise which I do a dozen times a day. I think as long as you feel relaxed on the inversion table, you are probably OK.

Anywho, take it easy.
TBone
TBone
 

decompression...

Postby RMinNJ » Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:30 pm

I have a herniated disc at L4-L5. I had purchased an inversion table.

I stopped using it and was trying to rely on my current physical therapy which isn't helping as much as I hoped. I tried the table the other night before bed at a very slight angle for 3 minutes and it seemed to help.

The decompression exercise in the book is a bit confusing. The picture in
the book is really bad depicting the person bending and holding onto something which would really hurt the lower back. Following the instructions it seems to be a wide squat using the chair to hold/pull oneself up. That is, if I use my arms to pull/hold myself up there is a decompression effect...although the chair shakes..supported by it's arm being under my desk. If one is to use one's legs to hold themself up I
don't see where the decompression effect comes from.
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Postby TBone » Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:55 pm

RMinNJ,

The squat has become an exercise I perform close to a dozen times a day. I have a way of doing it that I describe below, but I would only recommend it if you are ready. The last thing you want to do is hurt yourself by performing something that you aren't able to do yet. In other words, proceed with caution!

I hold onto the banister post of my stairs (or the knobs of a locked cabinet at work) and then from there I squat down and hold onto the post lightly. I try to let my butt sink and get as close to the floor as possible as I am squatting..creating a "C" shape from my butt to my head. I think this is where the decompression part of the exercise seems to kick in. I get some nice relief from it especially after sitting for a while.

To get a deeper stretch across all of my back muscles, I use my legs to sort of "push back" and hold on tighter to the banister so I don't fall backwards.

And, when I am done, I just go onto all fours instead of trying to push back up with my legs or pull myself up with my arms. It seems much safer.

When I read you post, it sounded like you were using effort to try and hold yourself up which would work against the decompression. I think you want to just "let" yourself sink into the squat and then hold onto the table leg or whatever so that you don't fall backwards.

I think the exercise is designed to open the vertebrate up hence the decompression.

HTH,
TBone
TBone
 

decompress..

Postby RMinNJ » Thu Aug 14, 2008 2:36 pm

Thanks tbone but I stil don't get it. If I squat on my legs my legs (and hence my back) are still holding my weight.
I thought the purpose of decompression is to stretch the back out by
getting weight off it.

The instructions and your description read like one is simply squatting down
on one's legs. I felt no decompression effect from this.. no pain either.
If I hold onto to something while doing this I had a tendency to pull on whatever I'm holding onto when squating. This feels really bad, the same as if I'm bending and reaching to lift something.

Are you saying keeping one's
legs outward in the squat and creating a V shape is suppose take weight off the back?

For decompression I think I'll stick with an inversion table.
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Postby TBone » Fri Aug 15, 2008 5:24 am

RMinNJ,

I'm not sure if I'm taking weight off my back when I do the squat. I think it is the fact that the vertebrate "open up" when I am in the squatting position. I get good relief from it. Either way, do what works. If inversion is helping then stick with it. I have a tennis player friend who used inversion to get rid of his back problem...he swears by it.

Take it easy
TBone
TBone
 

Re: decompress..

Postby yannick35 » Fri Aug 15, 2008 8:26 pm

RMinNJ wrote:Thanks tbone but I stil don't get it. If I squat on my legs my legs (and hence my back) are still holding my weight.
I thought the purpose of decompression is to stretch the back out by
getting weight off it.

The instructions and your description read like one is simply squatting down
on one's legs. I felt no decompression effect from this.. no pain either.
If I hold onto to something while doing this I had a tendency to pull on whatever I'm holding onto when squating. This feels really bad, the same as if I'm bending and reaching to lift something.

Are you saying keeping one's
legs outward in the squat and creating a V shape is suppose take weight off the back?

For decompression I think I'll stick with an inversion table.


Add the inversion table to your RYB program, perform all the decompression exercises.

I have been using the inversion table for more then 3 months now to create space between the lower back vertebrae and trying to rehydrate them.

But the pain doesnt go away that easy.
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