Rebuild your hip

Discussions relating to Lower Back Pain.

Rebuild your hip

Postby dodd » Sat Jun 09, 2007 5:27 pm

Is there any chance of Dean doing a book called rebuild your hip? I have a bad lower back but until I was properly diagnosed did I realize the pain was coming from my left hip which was impacting on my lower back. It turns out that I have a fracture which is compounded by arthritis and possibly avascular necrosis (a condition where there is not enough blood going to the bone causing the bone to subsequently die). Any reply would be appreciated

Regards

Tony Dodd
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Postby Mitch » Sun Jun 10, 2007 5:00 pm

Hi Tony,

Dean has an excellent book called, "The Pain Relief Manual" which covers joint problems the way his back books do. He explains in the intro to the book why he didn't name it "Rebuild Your Joints." I'd have to read it again to remember why exactly, but I think he didn't want to mislead people into thinking they were going to re-grow cartilage or something like that.

I'm not sure it would solve what you are describing, but it might get you started in the right direction. I use it and the back exercises for my warm-up routine before lifting weights. It helped me solve some long term joint pain and has allowed me to get back into bodybuilding. I'm sure my joints are still worn due to age and years of abuse, but they don't hurt anymore and that's all I care about.

Mitch
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Location: Muncie, IN

Postby dodd » Sun Jun 10, 2007 8:39 pm

Hi Mitch

Thanks for replying to my post so quickly. I have to be very cautious at the moment because the fracture and damaged cartilage are still playing havoc with my hip. Over the last two months, my ability to sit and walk have got better. I can walk 4 times further and sit much longer than before. I am very reluctant to go under the knife even though I may have dead bone in the femoral head of my hip especially since I have had some improvement. There is an operation which might restore blood flow, however I dont like the idea of a surgeon drilling into my bones to do this. I will have a look at the Pain relief Manual for any hints

Regards

Tony
dodd
 
Posts: 8
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Tony Dodd / Rebuild your hip

Postby Bill P » Wed Jun 13, 2007 5:04 pm

Tony,

The approach that I am presenting may not be the answer, but it will improve your health nonetheless, and is easy to follow.

First, I'll give you what is commonly known about a hormone that may be playing a role in your degeneration. Secondly, I'll theorize how it can be linked to avascular necrosis. (I would give this a try myself).

My reasoning may be flawed, but here are the known causes, and highly probable effects of avascular necrosis. As our bodies become slightly dehydrated, the body, in an effort to partition the reserves of water (like water restrictions during a drought) secretes a hormone called vasopressin. Vasopression is known as an anti-diuretic hormone because it causes the kidneys to conserve water. Hence, you urinate less and it is darker in appearance. The interesting parts of it's affect is the fact that it raises blood pressure by constricting blood vessels (making them narrower or smaller).

Vasopressin regulates the blood flow in a selective manner; it prioritizes the distribution of blood and water (remember blood plasma is about 90% water) to all parts of the body with the major organs getting closer to a normal supply. This is accomplished because some cells have more vasopressin receptors than others.

Most bones in the body have only one small artery entering through a single tight hole near the middle of it's length (avascular necrosis most commonly affects the long bones in the body - specifically the ends). If blood supply is diminished to your femur because the artery is constricted by vasopressin's influence, the end of the bone is slowly dying (as you mentioned) from the lack of blood, water and nutrients. Remember, the marrow is a soft, spongy substance. I would think that the middle of the femur nearest the blood supply gets most of the blood, nutrients and water, while the end receives little or nothing.

Another factor to consider that supports my point of view is that, under normal conditions, water is held within the cartilage for lubrication at the contact points (this is aside from the synovial fluid). I'm fairly certain that the water and nutrients come from the bone marrow itself to supply the ends. The growth of blood cells in the marrow takes priority over keeping the end of the bones alive or properly hydrated. By the way, this is a common cause of arthritis (reduced hydration over many years).

Let me point out that mild dehydration over many years is not noticeable because the 1st event in this chain is the loss of thirst. Here are some signs to help you determine if you are dehydrated; fatigue, headache, dry mouth, little or no urination, muscular weakness, dizziness, light-headedness (especially upon standing), constipation. The color of your urine should be very clear throughout the day. The darkest color, but still not a dark color, should be the 1st one of the morning.

To get vasopressin to stop it's diuretic action, drink 1/2 ounce of water for each lb of body weight. So, for someone weighing 200 lbs, 100 ounces of pure water would be needed each day. Beverages such as coffee, tea, soda or juice do not contribute towards this total. Exercise, heat, stress, caffeine and alcohol will increase this daily requirement. For each calorie expended during exercise, add 1cc of water to this daily total. Or, you can figure, for every 100 calories expended through exercise, 3 ounces of water is ample. Try, and be consistent throughout the day, week and month with the amount of water you consume.

Did you download Dean's book? I, myself, have the "Rebuild Your Back" book. He probably has useful information in some of the other books.

If you decide to give this a try, let me know, as there are some other things that you should do as well.

Tony, keep us posted. I hope this is of some help.

Bill P.
Bill P
 

Postby dodd » Thu Jun 14, 2007 4:45 pm

Bill

Thanks for the great advice. If you could send the other information that would be fantastic. I currently drink tap water but not filtered water so I will go out and buy a water filter. I normally drink about 6 glasses of water a day however this is tempered by 2-3 glasses of wine at times as well. I have Deans rebuild your Back, however with a fracture I have to be cautious in what movements I can do. Gentle stretching seems to be a key. I will try anything that will help.

Regards

Tony
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Tony Dodd / Rebuild your hip

Postby Bill P » Sat Jun 16, 2007 5:37 pm

Tony,

The acid/alkaline balance within your body may be a major contributing factor with regard to your hip condition. Let me explain.

The body is a collection of chemical factories that operates best and communicates with one another when the ph of the body is slighlty alkaline; at a ph of 7.2-7.4. The ph scale runs from 0 to 14 - with 0 to 6.9 being acidic, and 7.1 to 14 being alkaline. On the acidic end of the scale, as the number decreases, the solution is said to be more acidic, in other words 6.0 is more acidic than 6.9, and conversely, 7.1 is slightly alkaline, but less so than 8.0.

The manifestation of most diseases takes place when the solutions of the body remain in an acidic state. The first step in your recovery was the increased water intake to help maintain an alkaline environment, as well as to get water and nutrients to the femoral head. There are many things that can cause the body to become more acidic. Certain foods, most drugs, and the typical American diet are some of the more common culprits.

When the body is placed in a prolonged acidic state, the body begins to utilitize the calcium and magnesium from the bones in order to help alkalize the blood. Foods, to a large part, help create an acidic or alkaline environment. Therefore, check on the Internet for a site that gives you an acidic and alkaline food list.

In order to tell what your blood's ph level is, you need to purchase ph test strips. They are very inexpensive (about $8 US dollars for a pkg of 80). I get mine from "ph ion" their phone number is 1-888-744-8589. Just follow the instructions that come in the box. By testing both your saliva and your urine, you can track your progress.

Initially, try and keep your consumption of acidic foods low (no more than 25% of your daily total). Once your ph is near 7.0, you can up the acidic foods to 40%, just make sure to test your saliva and urine with the ph strips occasionally.

Tony, I'm just briefly touching on this topic, so feel free to ask any questions. I will try to answer them if I can.

Bill P
Bill P
 

Postby dodd » Tue Jun 19, 2007 5:14 pm

Bill

Thanks for the information. One question comes to mind. Does drinking that much water dilute the amount of electrolytes in the body? Sometime ago someone told me that If you drink more than 8 glasses of water a day the electrolyte levels can be dangerously dissipated.

As for the acid alkaline advice I will downloaded some information. I think my weight is a factor (16 stone, 6 feet tall) and I do have ostopenia. I wouild like to be able to exercise but the fractured hip is stoping me doing that right now.

Thanks again

Tony Dodd
dodd
 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:16 pm

Tony Dodd / Rebuild your hip

Postby Bill P » Thu Jun 21, 2007 5:52 pm

Tony,

Good point on the water/electrolyte balance issue. Somehow, I overlooked this major point in my reply to your condition.

Add just a pinch (as much as you can pinch with the thumb and forefinger) of sea salt to each liter of water. This will counterbalance any loss of electrolytes from the increased water consumption. Sea salt can replenish lost electrolytes as they contain all of the minerals you may have lost.

You can cut back 20% on the amount of water I recommended if you are eating a healthy diet. Tony, try and cut back on your salt intake elsewhere as excess salt isn't very healthful.

If you care to do some reading on the subject, a good book "The Salt Solution" by Herb Boynton, Mark F. McCarty and Richard D. Moore, MD PhD. The book covers the sodium-potassium ratios needed for good health, and the ill effects of too much sodium to potassium.

Keep us posted.

Bill P.
Bill P
 


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