Upper Back and Neck Pain ( Surgery or alternative medicine)

Discussions related to Upper Back and Neck Pain

Upper Back and Neck Pain ( Surgery or alternative medicine)

Postby rajaussie » Mon Feb 12, 2007 5:40 am

Hello Every Body,
I have an acute pain on right side of arm and neck. I Did MRI, XRay and doctors diagnosis says disc protusion in C4/C5 and C6. Further on neuro surgeon advised surgery for the same. I been to musculo specialist and he tried Cordisone injection however it was a futile attempt.

There is still acute pain going from my arm to right hand and thumb. The portion on top of the neck there is needle pinching pain.

However thank god, I can do minor jobs with my right hand. If any body can help or advise on alternative medicine to the surgery will be a great help.
Regards
rajaussie
rajaussie
 

Postby Steven » Tue Feb 13, 2007 9:26 am

Hi rajaussie,

I would really recommend that you read Dean's articles on herniated discs. Surgery is the common recommendation that a surgeon is going to make, but the evidence is equally in favor of physical rehabilitation.

We now know that discs do heal and shrink back to their normal shape over time if they receive the proper exercise and conditioning. We call it rebuilding your neck simply because that is what Dean calls it in his books.

There are various "alternative" therapies that some people find helpful in terms of temporary pain relief. I believe most of that is psychological rather than real.

Of those, I think massage therapy is about the only one I could feel comfortable recommending.

Steven
Steven
 
Posts: 112
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Thanks Steve

Postby AA » Sun Feb 18, 2007 4:58 pm

Dear Steve
Thanks very much for your kind reply. We will try and lets see how it goes. We heartily appreiciate the reply for the same.
Thanks
Regards
Rajaussie


Steven wrote:Hi rajaussie,

I would really recommend that you read Dean's articles on herniated discs. Surgery is the common recommendation that a surgeon is going to make, but the evidence is equally in favor of physical rehabilitation.

We now know that discs do heal and shrink back to their normal shape over time if they receive the proper exercise and conditioning. We call it rebuilding your neck simply because that is what Dean calls it in his books.

There are various "alternative" therapies that some people find helpful in terms of temporary pain relief. I believe most of that is psychological rather than real.

Of those, I think massage therapy is about the only one I could feel comfortable recommending.

Steven
AA
 

Postby randolph » Sat Feb 24, 2007 10:26 pm

Hi Rajaussie

I'd like to second Steven's recommendation to you to give the physical therapy (such as RYB) your very best effort. Lots of research indicates that in the long run, PT is as effective as surgery, without the risks/costs that come from surgery.

About the only advantage I can think of for taking the surgery option (before it's your very last resort because your condition has failed to improve from more conservative treatments) is that you might improve quicker. PT, for some, is a slow process; so if you have the resources to limit your activity for some time while you gradually rebuild your back with PT, it's a wise investment of time. I've known folks who didn't have the option and had to go for the "quicker fix" of surgery, and the gamble paid off for them. I opted for PT over the surgery, and have recovered without the surgery, though in my case it took over a year.

There are a lot of risks associated with surgery that the surgeons won't inform you about. See the resources link; read the NYTimes articles that Cygnet recommends; check out "A Knife in the Back" @ jeromegroopman.com; go to backpaindiscussiongroup.com forum and read the 1000's of horror stories from folks whose surgeries didn't work.

Unless you need surgery for a real emergency and/or the pain is becoming chronic and worse, a competent surgeon is most likely going to approve you wish to try the PT option first. Some are going to scare you with the old belief that delaying surgery decreases the likelihood of success with the surgery, but recent research indicates you don't have to rush into surgery.

For pain relief during the acute stage, I found OTC NSAID's effective and cheap. Massage felt good, but was extremely temporary and costly. Chiropractic was personally worse than useless (aggravated the pain), and costly.

Randolph
randolph
 
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Location: Wilkesboro NC


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