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Will Dean share his own experience

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 1:04 pm
by kshum88
Dean,

Thanks for this website which has been my inspiration during the past six months or so. I thought I was doing pretty good until a month ago a relapse happened to me. Now I understand that I need to take it gradually and slowly, and not rush things. Doing too much too much is a NO NO. There is absolutely no gain in rushing the nerve to heal.

I've read so many posts by the members here (Randolph has been my inspiration) but there is just not much information about yourself besides a brief introduction of you in the main website. I am interested to know your story, especially how you battled your back pain, the sciatica monster, and ultimately what you had gone through. I am sure other people (especially new members) in this Forum have the same interest as well.

Only if you would like to tell the story.

Kevin

PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2007 11:21 pm
by Dean
Hi Kevin,

There really isn't much more to tell that I haven't already related in the introductions to the books and what's on the "About" page. My story is not nearly as dramatic as Randolph's or krd's. In fact, it's really pretty boring.

I'm the sort of person that prefers to talk about things rather than about myself. I would rather this forum was about everyone else... and I'll just jump in from time to time if I think I have something to add.

Dean

PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 9:39 pm
by randolph
Hi Kevin

Dean does sprinkle some hints of his background in each of his e-books (especially the neck book). So if you haven't downloaded all them, by all means, do so.

And if I remember correctly, Dean didn't have sciatica. It just happened that folks who had sciatica who tried the RYB exercises (that Dean recommended for other back pain issues and repetitive stress syndrome), successfully healed ... just as he had from his non-sciatica back issues. One of those serendipitous things ... like the use of viagra for male ED. Viagra was initially developed and prescribed for certain heart problems, but surprised everyone (usually pleasantly) with its very interesting side-effect.

I'm glad to read you're bouncing back after your relapse. My relapse was, in many ways, harder to take than the initial weeks of my sciatica. But thankfully, the acute "10 scale" pain didn't take so long to subside. I later made the mistake of letting my natural fear of another relapse morph into lots of protective, "babying-my-back" behavior, which delayed my recovery ... so remember to continue "pushing the envelope" a bit so you make slow, gradual, steady improvement in your strength and flexibility. There may be a week or two when you need to take a break from the exercising ... but you don't want to plateau for very long. Apparently, healing of the nerve is maximized by appropriate exercising and stretching. Sort of like muscles getting stronger and more flexible in response to exercise and stretching.

Randolph