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Stuart McGill, PhD.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 8:02 pm
by randolph
Check out LOW BACK DISORDERS: EVIDENCE-BASED PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION by Stuart McGill. For the past 25 years, he's been scientifically evaluating various exercises (including those recommended in RYB) for effectiveness in rebuilding injured backs. This is no collection of anecdotal info-mercial feel-good fog; here's real, clinical evidence of what exercises to avoid; what exercises to do and how to do them properly. This book published 2002; another more recent book applies the research to teach athletes how to increase performance without risking back injury.

I found my copy in the local community college library; retails for $45 at amazon

Also very good chapters on the dangers of wearing a back brace for lifting work; how to do common, everyday chores without risking back injury; and really indepth info on how the various muscles, ligaments and bones in the lower back work together.

The doctor's bottom line for us sciatica sufferers seems to be this: initially, do only those exercises that place a minimum of pressure on the intervertebral disc while maintaining a nuetral spine (the old "lift with you legs, not your back" posture). HAVE PATIENCE: healing can take YEARS. Slowly add strengthening exercises that very gradually place loads on the lumbar spine.

Maintaining a nuetral spine during activity is apparently paramount. Exercises like improperly done situps, stretching excessively (especially forward or side bends), and the seal, place excessive loads on the lumbar spine that can do more damage to the already weakened back of those with disc damage.

Much of what Dean recommends in his books is verified.

Randolph

PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 4:02 pm
by Dean
Thanks Randolph,

I'm not familiar with this one. I'll have to give it a look see. Sounds like a valuable resource.

Thanks,
Dean