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Spondylolisthesis

Posted: Thu Dec 27, 2007 9:08 am
by Little Stone
With a diagnostic of L4L5 spondylolisthesis, I am wondering if I should be extra careful with Back Bend?? I really want to get my strenght back.
Thank for your help :?

Posted: Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:37 am
by Steven
Did doing the exercise cause you pain? If not, then you have nothing to worry about. As long as you follow the instructions in the book you'll be fine.

Re: Spondylolisthesis

Posted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 11:15 am
by Bill P
Little Stone wrote:With a diagnostic of L4L5 spondylolisthesis, I am wondering if I should be extra careful with Back Bend?? I really want to get my strenght back.
Thank for your help :?
Little Stone,

Spondylolisthesis is a forward subluxation of the involved vertebrae ("subluxation" is a fancy word for slippage). It is further classified as being a stage I to a stage IV. Stage I is less than a 25% subluxation. Stage II is a forward subluxation of between 25-50% in relationship to the adjacent vertebrae. Stage III finds the vertebrae between 50-75% forward of the adjoining vertebrae.

Because of the nature of spondylolisthesis, it is not advisable to do certain exercises or activities that involve extending the spine backward. Conversely, flexion of the spine (bendng forward from the midline) has its benefits for someone with spondylolisthesis since flexion applies rearward pressure to the forward vertebrae.

There is actually a test to help an examiner determine if the individual being examined with back pain has spondylolisthesis, which involves extending the spine backward. The test is called "the Stork Standing Test" or "the Spondylolisthesis Test". The test requires the person to stand on one leg, hands on hips, and extend the spine backward. The test is performed on both sides; right and left legs. If the individual experiences pain while performing this test on either side, it may indicate that they have spondylolisthesis. Naturally it must be confirmed with an X-ray.

The good news for someone with spondylolisthesis is that from the middle adult years onward, rarely does the condition worsen from a Stage I to a Stage II, or from a Stage II to a Stage III. As Steven pointed out, follow the instructions in Dean's book; just limit the amount of back bending - especially when standing.

There are a few activities that I would avoid which are running, and playing golf. Running can aggravate the problem due to the extreme use of the psoas muscle while running, and the fact that it tends to become facilitated rather quickly, and shortens and tightens (it attaches on the femur and the spine). Conversely, the running stride tugs on the lower spine. With regard to playing golf, the rotation and extension of the golf swing can play havoc with a forward subluxed vertebrae.

Again, use common sense if a movement or activity causes pain or discomfort, stop that particular movement. Cycling, especially using a "road bike", is an excellent sport that won't hurt someone with spondylolisthesis (you could also choose to ride a mountain bike, but I suspect it wouldn't help as much). The position on a road bike has your low back flexed forward, and this is the reason it is beneficial You may actually find it actually helps alleviate some of the pain involved when it flares up.

Little Stone, I realize you probably already know most of what is in this post, but it may be of help to someone new to spondylolisthesis. Your concern with back bending is well warranted. Good Luck and keep us posted.

Bill P

Re: Spondylolisthesis

Posted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 10:10 am
by Felisaty
Bill P wrote:Again, use common sense if a movement or activity causes pain or discomfort, stop that particular movement. Cycling, especially using a "road bike", is an excellent sport that won't hurt someone with spondylolisthesis (you could also choose to ride a mountain bike, but I suspect it wouldn't help as much). The position on a road bike has your low back flexed forward, and this is the reason it is beneficial You may actually find it actually helps alleviate some of the pain involved when it flares up.
Bill P
I know this post is quite old, but I wanted to say thank you Bill P for sharing your knowledge on cycling with spondy. I was diagnosed this January and have been under Chiro/massage therapy care with decompression for a few months. It's helping me tremendously and I also will be getting an MRI in a few days just to confirm what the xrays from earlier in the year show. Current chiro doc is very encouraging of riding a road / hybrid / comfort bike to improve my health, spondy and lose weight. I really appreciate seeing your post as it further reaffirms what I've been told and I am so hopeful that I can work my way up to cycling for an hour or two at a time over the next several months to a years time. Hope you are well, take care. - Lisa