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Disc Protrusion

PostPosted: Sun Apr 23, 2006 12:38 am
by Jeff
Hello,

My I am 41 - Back in 2001 he was diagnosed with the following:-

L3/4: there is a broad based central and paracentral subligamentous disc protrusion which projects slightly more to the right than the left and indents the central thecal sac and contacts the descending left L$ nerve roots on both sides most marked on the right. There is a transverse annular tear inferiorly. The intervertebral foramina appear normal.

L4/5: There is a central and paracentral subligamentous disc protrusion which indents the central thecal sac and is slightly more prominent on the left side. The protrusion contacts the descending L5 nerve roots most marked on the left. The intervertebral foramina define normally. There is a transverse annular tear associated with a disc protrusion.

L5/S1: there is a minor and central annular protrusion which is non compressive.


Gradually over the years the pain is getting worse. I recently suffered a major set back were he could hardly move and with exercise has got myself back to work - but is in pain and only "just" hanging in there. I am a wall and floor tiler (which doesn't help matters) but with a young family we can't afford to go on the pension and I have to work. I have my own business and it is not easy to say find another job. I also struggle with the fact that I can't run around with my children or even go for a hit of tennis with my girls. We are at the end of our rope and don't know what to do. I live in constant pain and restrictment. I do exercises every day to try and build up my stomach muscles and I walk every day -although I think it helps me get to work each day - it isn't improving.

Can you see that your book "Rebuild your back" would be of any help to me. We are struggling financially and at this stage can't even afford the surgery option - we don't need gimmicks - but if this is something that could help us - please advise. I would love to hear of peoples stories with similar complaints.

Thank you so much
Jeff (and my wife Teresa)
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 10:00 am
by Hugo Posh
Looks like you had an MRI. You have some nerve compression secondary to disc protrusion. I bet you are feeling some pain down the legs. I cannot comment on the book but it looks as though it has helped quite a few people. Have you gone to a chiropractor? Preferably one who practices "Cox" flexion/distraction? I understand your situation being self employed and all. Yes, your type of job definitely is not helping the situation.

(Edited by Admin. Advertising is not allowed in this forum.)

PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:21 am
by randolph
Hello Jeff

Sounds like you've gotten some great medical help diagnosing probable causes for your back and leg pain ... and if I was in your shoes, I'd be willing to try the RYB program ... but first got to do something to relieve the pain and somehow slow you down and reduce the physical load on your body, so you can rebuild and recover.

To relieve the pain, Hugo may have a good recommendation ... chiropractic is sometimes effective in reducing pain. I'd check chirobase.org and read the articles there on how to choose a competent DC; you want to make sure you see the red flags of questionable chiropractic, such as those practicing Palmer methods, before something is done to you that could harm you or wastes your money.

Another option for pain relief is Dean's Pain Relief Manual. Lots of good tips there, that are very helpful, and helped me greatly.

As to slowing you down, would it be possible for you to hire an apprentice to do the heavy lifting, etc., to reduce the physical burden of your work? (The tilesetting journeyman I apprenticed with for a year sure seemed to have the easiest half of the jobs we did together!!) Could you reduce your living expenses for a few months, so you could live on that reduced income, and give your body a break, while you try the RYB program?

Besides the pain, the hardest part of the rebuilding process for me was just accepting the facts that: one, I would have to slow down more than I wanted to allow the body time to heal and rebuild; and two, my wife and kids were really quite able (and willing!) to live on much less, and pick up the slack, while I recuperated. Have you really given your body the chance it needs for that down time?

Dean says in his books, and I've read medical article abstracts that seem to verify it, that 90% of folks in your condition do respond well to physical therapy, such as that recommended in RYB. And if you're not experiencing neurologic degeneration or cauda equina syndrome, surgery is probably not indicated anyway. Surgery also seems less effective, with more negative side effects, for those who have the surgery more than a year or so after onset of symptoms. So your best option, after doing battle with this monster for 5 years now, may indeed be something like RYB.

Hope this helps some.

PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2006 5:19 pm
by Jeanette
randolph wrote:
Sounds like you've gotten some great medical help diagnosing probable causes for your back and leg pain ... and if I was in your shoes, I'd be willing to try the RYB program ... but first got to do something to relieve the pain and somehow slow you down and reduce the physical load on your body, so you can rebuild and recover.

*****
Besides the pain, the hardest part of the rebuilding process for me was just accepting the facts that: one, I would have to slow down more than I wanted to allow the body time to heal and rebuild....Have you really given your body the chance it needs for that down time?


I think Randolph's pinned down the gist of back pain recovery pretty well. Even before you consider rebuilding exercises, there's simply a part of recovery that involves giving your back a rest, and that involves time. And when you're busy and involved, that sometimes seems impossible. But Randolph's suggestion that you find an apprentice to give you some help with the bending and lifting is a good one. I, too, have been in a situation where I couldn't just quit doing what I do, but I could back off and go slowly. I'm sure that's been a factor in my returning to some semblance of "normal."

And, no, it's not always easy to admit that you have to set limits for yourself, but it's better than winding up more seriously injured than you find yourself now.

Good luck.